Boris Bilinsky, poster artwork for the french release of Metropolis, 1927.

1 Poster Cityscape Montage #1 – Bilinsky used images from the film for the artwork. 2 Movie poster: Kunstbibliothek, Staatliche Museen / Stiftung Preußischer Kulturbesitz, Berlin. More: mubi.com / uow.edu.au

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, chair Model 90, 1929. Hand-forged steel, hemp. Metal work: Joseph Müller, made by Berliner Metallgewerbe, Germany. Via Cooper Hewitt

Ludwig Hohlwein, poster artwork for a Grammophone shop, 1925. Featuring portable record players: Glückliche Reise! Bon voyage! Munich, Germany.

Ludwig Hohlwein, poster artwork for a Grammophone shop, 1925. Featuring portable record players: Glückliche Reise! Bon voyage! Munich, Germany.

Alfred Willimann, artwork for the exhibition poster Licht, 1932. For Kunstgewerbemuseum Zürich, Switzerland.

Alfred Willimann, artwork for the exhibition poster Licht, 1932. For Kunstgewerbemuseum Zürich, Switzerland.

La Science et la Vie, 1928. France. The magazine was launched 1913 and persists to this day, called Sciene & Vie. Via svapicsmags

Luckhardt & Anker, drawing for Telschow House, Berlin, 1926. Including “Reklame”. It was built 1928-29. Source

Luckhardt & Anker, drawing for Telschow House, Berlin, 1926. Including “Reklame”. It was built 1928-29. Source

Cover of Gebrauchsgraphik, International Advertising Art, 1930. Unknown artist. Berlin.

Cover of Gebrauchsgraphik, International Advertising Art, 1930. Unknown artist. Berlin.

Walter Dorwin Teague, Kodak Baby Brownie Special, 1939-54. Eastman Kodak Co. USA. Via museoscienza. Production of the tiny camera started 1934. This was the first model made of bakelite.

Walter Dorwin Teague, Kodak Baby Brownie Special, 1939-54. Eastman Kodak Co. USA. Via museoscienza. Production of the tiny camera started 1934. This was the first model made of bakelite.

Chesley Bonestell, poster artwork for New York Central Building, 1930. 

Almost fifty years after the 1929 edifice was designed by Warren & Wetmore, it was renamed the Helmsley Building to honor its owner, New York real-estate mogul Harry Helmsley. Source

Chesley Bonestell, poster artwork for New York Central Building, 1930. 

Almost fifty years after the 1929 edifice was designed by Warren & Wetmore, it was renamed the Helmsley Building to honor its owner, New York real-estate mogul Harry Helmsley. Source