Josef Albers, paper folding at the Black Mountain College, 1940s. Spatial movement, a lesson he was also teaching at the bauhaus. Source

Josef Albers, paper folding at the Black Mountain College, 1940s. Spatial movement, a lesson he was also teaching at the bauhaus. Source

Olympic gold medal, Munich 1972. Deutsches Sportmuseum
It was the first time since 1928, that a new back side should be designed. The jury did choose the “buddies”, not only because Gerhard Marcks was one of the last bauhaus masters around that time, but the motif he did choose was Castor and Pollux, the patrons of battle games and friendship, a well fitting symbolism.

Olympic gold medal, Munich 1972. Deutsches Sportmuseum

It was the first time since 1928, that a new back side should be designed. The jury did choose the “buddies”, not only because Gerhard Marcks was one of the last bauhaus masters around that time, but the motif he did choose was Castor and Pollux, the patrons of battle games and friendship, a well fitting symbolism.

Wilhelm Wagenfeld. Hot-water pot, designed 1929/30. Made by Walther & Wagner for the Weimar Bauhochschule, 1930. Chrome-plated kupal, wooden handle. Via Quittenbaum

Wilhelm Wagenfeld. Hot-water pot, designed 1929/30. Made by Walther & Wagner for the Weimar Bauhochschule, 1930. Chrome-plated kupal, wooden handle. Via Quittenbaum

Marianne Brandt, Candlestick, 1929-32. Via Quittenbaum.

Marianne Brandt, Candlestick, 1929-32. Via Quittenbaum.

Walter Gropius, Internationale Architektur, Bauhausbücher 1, 1925. The complete book via Charnelhouse. No. 73: Design of a beach house by Gropius/Meyer

Asked by AnonymousAnonymous
Dear friendthe quote on Oskar Schelemmer "tell me how you party and I'll tell you who youo are", where is it from?I'd really apretiate if you woud tell me.Yours barbara
Posted by ideageneration Answer

It is from his diary, February 1929. From O. Schlemmer, “Mensch und Kunstfigur”. Original Quote: “Die früheren Feste in Weimar…bezeichnen die heiteren, festlichen Stationen auf dem sonst keineswegs leidlosen Weg dieses Instituts. Sage mir, wie du Feste feierst, und ich werde dir sagen, wer du bist, oder: Jede Gesellschaftsschicht hat das Fest, das sie verdient. 

"The previous festivals in Weimar … denote the cheerful, festive stations on the otherwise not free from suffering way this institute takes. Tell me how you celebrate feasts, and I will tell you who you are, or: Each social class has the feast that it deserves.

Translating feast with contemporary “party” is ok, I guess ;)

Hope this helps.

Ellen Lauterbach, Eckstein with Lipstick, 1930. ringl+pit, Berlin. More to see: flickr ringlandpit

In the late 1920s, Ellen Auerbach and Grete Stern both studied in Berlin at the Bauhaus before establishing a commercial photographic studio, ringl + pit (named for their nicknames: ringl [Stern] and pit [Auerbach]). Their business specialized in advertising and portrait photography. Source

Ellen Lauterbach, Eckstein with Lipstick, 1930. ringl+pit, Berlin. More to see: flickr ringlandpit

In the late 1920s, Ellen Auerbach and Grete Stern both studied in Berlin at the Bauhaus before establishing a commercial photographic studio, ringl + pit (named for their nicknames: ringl [Stern] and pit [Auerbach]). Their business specialized in advertising and portrait photography. Source

Alma Siedhoff-Buscher, Child’s suite of cabinets, 1923. Wood and chipboard, polychromatic paint. Made by Bauhaus Weimar or Dessau. Via Quittenbaum

Curt Fischer, bauhaus scissor lamp, Scherenlampe, late 1920s. Iron, aluminium, bakelite. Bauhauswerkstätte Walter Gropius. Made by Midgard. Via okay art

Marianne, Brandt, bauhaus desk set Schreibzeug, 1930s. Made by Ruppelwerke, Germany. 

Karel Teige, magazine ReD. Ročník I, 1927-28. Prague.

Featuring bauhaus design of Breuer & Wagenfeld, Man Ray, Alfred Loos architecture, Moholy-Nagy, the exhibition Paris or Charlie Chaplin. Via NYPL

Adolf G.Schneck, chair, 1925-28. Made by Deutsche Werkstätten, Munich. Via V&A

Schneck was a Stuttgart architect who wrote the standard book of the 1920s on chair design entitled Der Stuhl. The chair admirably reflects the simplicity of furniture then being made under the influence of the Bauhaus.

Adolf G.Schneck, chair, 1925-28. Made by Deutsche Werkstätten, Munich. Via V&A

Schneck was a Stuttgart architect who wrote the standard book of the 1920s on chair design entitled Der Stuhl. The chair admirably reflects the simplicity of furniture then being made under the influence of the Bauhaus.